1. ianference:

Often in my travels, I come across buildings that are becoming overtaken by nature.  Vines crawl through broken windows in derelict asylums, reaching in to meet the moss that blankets the walls.  On the top floor of a crumbling school in Harlem, a tree has been growing for decades.  But nowhere is this theme more obvious than at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island.  Kudzu and other climbing vines have overwhelmed the former quarantine island that once played home to “Typhoid” Mary Mallon, creeping up the sides of buildings, cascading into top-floor rooms through holes in ceilings.  Here, in what was once an open field in front of the now-collapsed chapel, the kudzu is so dense that one must move slowly so as not to get tangled up in it.  In the distance, it is overwhelming the coal house and obscures any view of the power plant besides the looming smokestack.  This is truly a place where nature is winning the battle.
Prints available here.
  2. findingharlem:

Beauty atop Sugar Hill, Harlem.
  3. findingharlem:

April Showers
  4. fckyeahblackgaycouples:

Kahary I. (Left) and Dennis Rice Jr. (Right)
  5. aagdolla:

menswear
  6. bearing—love:

bearing—love:

Boifrand. 

^_^
  7. nokiabae:

    Kine, Faith, WeruWeru and Faro - Viviane SassenEast Africa(2007-2011)

    (via alicewonder)

  8. adornedwithebony:

Come away with me (and my afro)
  9. burnedshoes:

    © Paul Kwilecki, "Georgia"

    #1: Girl with Afro sitting on bumper of old car, 1970
    #2: Oak City Cemetery, main gate, 5:00 a.m., 1996
    #3: Man without shirt and woman on porch, Battle’s Quarters, 1971
    #4: Trailways Bus Station, 1978

    Paul Kwilecki’s Photograph Collection at Duke University contains 583 black and white prints made in and around the town of Bainbridge, Georgia from 1960-2008. A self-taught photographer, Kwilecki honed his craft by photographing the broad spectrum of daily life manifested in Bainbridge and the rural areas of Decatur County. From the Shade Tobacco workers in the fields to the tombstones in the cemeteries and the emotional dramas played out in the Decatur County Courthouse, Kwilecki documented everything in an effort to capture and understand humanity. (read more here & here)

    (via tuttiiviventi)

  10. tuttiiviventi:

Lorenzo Dow Turner - Gullah woman standing in front of her house, 1931
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